Lepcha children in Earthquake damaged school building, Dzongu, Sikkim - Lepchas, the designated 'primitive' tribe  of Dzongu in Sikkim have been opposing the 24 dam hydropower project  being built on the Teesta river as it is destroying the ecology around their sacred mountain, Khangchendzonga. The quake of September 2011 came as no surprise to them. Lepcha children in Earthquake damaged school building, Dzongu, Sikkim - Lepchas, the designated 'primitive' tribe  of Dzongu in Sikkim have been opposing the 24 dam hydropower project  being built on the Teesta river as it is destroying the ecology around their sacred mountain, Khangchendzonga. The quake of September 2011 came as no surprise to them.
Lachen, Sikkim, India Lachen, Sikkim, India
Roof of the world, The Himalayas, India. Roof of the world, The Himalayas, India.
Lachen, Sikkim, India. Lachen, Sikkim, India.
Zanskar river, Jammu & Kashmir, India. Zanskar river, Jammu & Kashmir, India.
Ladakh, Jammu & Kashmir, India Ladakh, Jammu & Kashmir, India
Crack in a Gompa wall, Dzongu, Sikkim - Lepchas, the designated 'primitive' tribe  of Dzongu in Sikkim have been opposing the 24 dam hydropower project  being built on the Teesta river as it is destroying the ecology around their sacred mountain, Khangchendzonga. The quake of September 2011 came as no surprise to them. Read more about it here - http://goo.gl/2CVLVP Crack in a Gompa wall, Dzongu, Sikkim - Lepchas, the designated 'primitive' tribe  of Dzongu in Sikkim have been opposing the 24 dam hydropower project  being built on the Teesta river as it is destroying the ecology around their sacred mountain, Khangchendzonga. The quake of September 2011 came as no surprise to them. Read more about it here - http://goo.gl/2CVLVP
Jadav Payeng aka Forest man of India at Molai Kathoni, the forest he created on an island of the Brahmaputra river, Assam, India. For almost 30 years, off everyone’s radar, without support or subsidies, without fear or favour, without Forest Department or foreign hand, Payeng, almost obsessively, continued to expand the forest and the fruit of his labour is now being celebrated around the world. Read more about him - http://goo.gl/3OWiKh Jadav Payeng aka Forest man of India at Molai Kathoni, the forest he created on an island of the Brahmaputra river, Assam, India. For almost 30 years, off everyone’s radar, without support or subsidies, without fear or favour, without Forest Department or foreign hand, Payeng, almost obsessively, continued to expand the forest and the fruit of his labour is now being celebrated around the world. Read more about him - http://goo.gl/3OWiKh
  • Lepcha children in Earthquake damaged school building, Dzongu, Sikkim - Lepchas, the designated 'primitive' tribe of Dzongu in Sikkim have been opposing the 24 dam hydropower project being built on the Teesta river as it is destroying the ecology around their sacred mountain, Khangchendzonga. The quake of September 2011 came as no surprise to them.
    Lepcha children in Earthquake damaged school building, Dzongu, Sikkim - Lepchas, the designated 'primitive' tribe of Dzongu in Sikkim have been opposing the 24 dam hydropower project being built on the Teesta river as it is destroying the ecology around their sacred mountain, Khangchendzonga. The quake of September 2011 came as no surprise to them.
    Lachen, Sikkim, India
    Roof of the world, The Himalayas, India.

    The Himalayas, sometimes called ‘the roof of the world’, are the most extensive and rugged high altitude areas on Earth with over a hundred mountains exceeding 7,200 metres in elevation and the largest areas covered by glaciers and permafrost outside the polar regions. Himalayan glaciers are also referred to as Earth's ‘third pole" and Asia’s ‘water towers’ because they supply fresh water to communities throughout South Asia. Roughly 210 million people live in the region, and another 1.3 billion people who live downstream depend on rivers fed in part by glaciers and mountain snowpacks.

    Lachen, Sikkim, India.
    Lachen, the home of Lachenpas, the indigenous people of north Sikkim is in grip of a climate calamity. Unseasonal rainfall, unusually stormy weather, landslides, receding glaciers, short winters, accelerated snowmelt, longer summers, fears of water scarcity, failed crops, mosquitoes, and a clear and present threat of a glacial lake outburst floods (GLOF). But the biggest worry for the Lachenpas is the barren patches on the Angden Lama peak (top left) that is a constant reminder of how climate change will change everything for them in the near future. “If there is water, there is a village, if not, there is nobody.” is an old saying amongst the people of the Himalayas.

    Climate change is having a severe impact on the amount of snow and ice precipitation in the Himalayas, which has serious implications for downstream water availability in both short and long term as up to 50% of the average annual flows in the rivers are contributed by snow and glacial melting. The melting glaciers would mean floods and fast run-offs in the rivers in the short term and droughts and water scarcity in the long term. Irregular availability of water is going to be the biggest hazard in future. This will alter the area’s erosion, river discharge and sediment patterns.

    Zanskar river, Jammu & Kashmir, India.

    Climate change is having a severe impact on the amount of snow and ice precipitation in the Himalayas, which has serious implications for downstream water availability in both short and long term as up to 50% of the average annual flows in the rivers are contributed by snow and glacial melting. The melting glaciers would mean floods and fast run-offs in the rivers in the short term and droughts and water scarcity in the long term. Irregular availability of water is going to be the biggest hazard in future. This will alter the area’s erosion, river discharge and sediment patterns.

    Ladakh, Jammu & Kashmir, India
    The Himalayas have a very fragile ecosystem and contain a series of climatically very different zones within short distances and elevations. They display a range of micro-habitats with great biodiversity. Mountain ecosystems are extremely sensitive to climate change and are beginning to show signs of fragmentation and degradation. Climate change has exacerbated the debilitating impacts of reduced forest cover, accelerated soil erosion, increased silting of water bodies, drying-up of springs, and the disappearance of many species of flora and fauna.
    Crack in a Gompa wall, Dzongu, Sikkim - Lepchas, the designated 'primitive' tribe of Dzongu in Sikkim have been opposing the 24 dam hydropower project being built on the Teesta river as it is destroying the ecology around their sacred mountain, Khangchendzonga. The quake of September 2011 came as no surprise to them. Read more about it here - http://goo.gl/2CVLVP
    Crack in a Gompa wall, Dzongu, Sikkim - Lepchas, the designated 'primitive' tribe of Dzongu in Sikkim have been opposing the 24 dam hydropower project being built on the Teesta river as it is destroying the ecology around their sacred mountain, Khangchendzonga. The quake of September 2011 came as no surprise to them.
    Jadav Payeng aka Forest man of India at Molai Kathoni, the forest he created on an island of the Brahmaputra river, Assam, India. For almost 30 years, off everyone’s radar, without support or subsidies, without fear or favour, without Forest Department or foreign hand, Payeng, almost obsessively, continued to expand the forest and the fruit of his labour is now being celebrated around the world. Read more about him - http://goo.gl/3OWiKh
    Jadav Payeng aka Forest man of India at Molai Kathoni, the forest he created on an island of the Brahmaputra river, Assam, India. For almost 30 years, off everyone’s radar, without support or subsidies, without fear or favour, without Forest Department or foreign hand, Payeng, almost obsessively, continued to expand the forest and the fruit of his labour is now being celebrated around the world. Read more about him in my reportage section.